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Press Room. This contains contents of articles from The Chronicles of Oklahoma, the scholarly journal of the Oklahoma Historical Society.

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Purchase past issues through the online storeor view issues on The Gateway to Oklahoma History. Use the links below to go directly to a specific volume or year. Volume 85 Volume 84 Volume 82 Volume 81 Volume 80 Volume 79 Volume 78 Volume 77 Volume 76 Volume 75 Volume 74 Volume 73 Volume 72 Volume 71 Volume 70 Moore and Pamela Unruh Brown. Ricki J.

Williams established an Oklahoma Council of Defense and similar county groups, which were extralegal committees empowered to maintain patriotism and order. The Tulsa Council of Defense was particularly active in promoting Liberty Bond drives and suppressing dissent from the International Workers of the World and other labor organizations. Randy Hopkins describes the actions of the Tulsa Council of Defense, shows how its vigilante violence led directly to the emergence of the Ku Klux Klan in the city, and foreshadows the horrors of the Tulsa Race Massacre of During the nineteenth century, the Tonkawa people were moved to several different reservation areas in Texas and Oklahoma.

Through the course of these moves, they made alliances with different groups of Anglo-Americans—Texans, the US government, and the Confederacy—which served to alienate them from the American Indian tribes that surrounded them. Joseph Connole relates the story of the Tonkawa Massacre offaulting Union and Confederate forces for not honoring treaty obligations in defending their Tonkawa allies.

Joe Cummings weaves together the stories of three Rough Riders—Roosevelt, Frank Frantz, and Walter Cook—to illustrate how the common experience of war can unite even the most dissimilar of Americans and change their lives. To fulfill this destiny, explorers created trails to facilitate the movement of greater s of white pioneers.

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As a teacher and the adviser for the NAACP Youth Council, she taught countless children and teenagers how to demonstrate peacefully as they fought for their civil rights. Rachel E. Four newspapers were established in the town to cater to the different racial groups and political leanings of the citizens. Angela M. Person analyzes the discourse in these four local newspapers, and how that discourse reflected an erosion in African American rights. In the early twentieth century, rural communities often lacked access to healthcare.

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Maggie Koenig was one of the members of a traveling health caravan known as the Child Welfare Special, which brought public health programs to rural populations. Dan Lawrence describes the work of the Child Welfare Special, and the contributions of Koenig to public health and her community at large. The ificance of the casting and content of this film has been studied in recent years due to its rerelease by the Oklahoma Historical Society.

Wendi M. Bevitt posits that The Daughter of Dawn was used as a tool to preserve and promote aspects of American Indian culture to a broad, movie-going audience.

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The campaign brought mock air battles, passenger rides, and aerial photography to Oklahoma City and Tulsa as part of the show. Alan L. Roesler chronicles the two days that the Flying Circus spent in those cities, and emphasizes the impact of its exhibitions on the future of aviation in the state.

Before statehood, Edmond was home to a small but vibrant African American neighborhood. African American families saw Oklahoma Territory as a land of opportunity, free from the codified Jim Crow of the surrounding states. As the territory moved toward statehood, however, it became clear that segregation and restrictions on voting rights would come with it.

Christopher P. Lehman describes the nearly forgotten African American community centered around West Edwards Street in territorial Edmond. As the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union escalated in the s, Americans responded to the threat of nuclear attack with the creation of community fallout shelters.

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Landry Brewer discusses this atmosphere of anxiety that bred a need for preparedness in local communities and college campuses across western Oklahoma. That Man Stone Company captured the early days of Oklahoma through the lens of its cameras. Phil Sutton describes the origins of this company and how it flourished, recording four decades of state history. Fort Sill is known for its Artillery Training Center, but few remember its legacy in military aviation. The first military aircraft arrived at Fort Sill in July of It also was a center for observation balloon training.

Thomas A. George McLaurin was admitted to the University of Oklahoma College of Education inbut he was required to sit in an anteroom, segregated from his classmates. Through a close analysis of building diagrams, Eric Lomazoff and Bailie Gregory show the evolution of the classroom that would become the focal point of a landmark US Supreme Court case.

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Sixty years earlier, OHS staff marked this important trade and transit route with historical markers. Susan Penn Dragoo retraces this road, describing Okla latin amateur woman wanted for prince landmarks as they appeared on the trek as well as their present conditions. In child prodigy Willmoore Kendall was born in Oklahoma. As an adult, he worked as an intelligence analyst and a college professor while honing political thought that would influence the likes of William F.

Buckley Jr. Christopher H. McCullagh and James S. Carter Sr. Wikle and Dale R. Herbert L. McCullagh and Stephanie Schmidt. In part one of his two-part work, Paul F. Lambert begins a thorough biography of Mitchell and relates his ificance in western Oklahoma politics and journalism.

Volume 92, No. Justin Castro and Lindsay Compton. Edward Rolison. Specht The oil industry is inexorably linked with the state of Oklahoma. An outgrowth of the industry is a rich history of petroleum-related songs. These songs describe life in boomtowns and after busts. Joe W. Specht gives an overview of the oilfield songs written and performed by Oklahoma songwriters and singers from the s to today. Widener Muscogee Indian Alexander Posey is well known for his literary career, but he also spent time as a speculator and a member of one of the Dawes Commission enrollment parties.

Jeffrey M. Quincy R. Hightower From the French trade of the Chouteaus to the military forts of the frontier, commerce on the rivers of Oklahoma has driven settlement. People traveled on riverboats for business or pleasure, and Michael J. Hightower argues that those travels left indelible marks on the landscape of Indian Territory. Roberson At one time the diagnosis of tuberculosis was a terrifying prospect. Forrest Pitt Baker improved the lives of Oklahomans afflicted with this dreaded disease.

Glen Roberson shows how the sanatorium in Talihina became a haven for people who not only needed a specific type of care but also needed a home away from home. Widener From the earliest days of Oklahoma City following the Land Run ofimmigrants from Latin American countries have settled in the area. They created communities within Oklahoma City that thrive today. Jeffrey Widener explores the history of Latino influence in Oklahoma City as well as the continuing growth of the vibrant Hispanic cultural landscape.

As Linda Ford Wendel shows, hard work was a part of daily life, but music, family visits, and Creek cultural activities were also encouraged. This desire led to experiments with daytime and nighttime airmail routes. Wikle describes how Oklahoma became a crossro in the coast-to-coast lighted airmail delivery system and the social, technological, and cultural developments that accompanied this advancement. Stein, 4— Since the mid-nineteenth century cycles of boom and bust have characterized Oklahoma history. Miller, 24— Martin, Jr. Justin Castro, — Hightower, — Simpson, —

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